Kill the K-cup

 

Kill the K-cup

Keurig really should have figured out it would be in trouble from the get-go.  It’s not just the environmental effects of all those pods that produce waste in the billions of pounds, but it’s the contaminants that can also effect your health like plastic from the pod, aluminum from the pod cover, and mold that grows in the tank that holds the water.  My mother had one of these on her counter, but she had rheumatoid arthritis and lived alone so for her it was a life-saver and I looked the other way.

Now, about 16 million households in America have one of these fancy pants coffee machines for a variety of reasons, but the most prevalent, I guess, is convenience coupled with the perfect cup of coffee.  Yet even the inventor of the K-cup has regrets about trashing the environment.  Maybe rather than regrets he can attempt to make a recyclable version that takes less than a thousand years to breakdown?

Can you think of a worse environmental result for a single consumer product?  Read this great article by Home Grounds and you decide.

And then watch this hilarious video on the K-cup.

Then ditch that pod.

pamlazos 4.11.19

 

About Pam Lazos

writer, blogger, environmentally hopeful
This entry was posted in conscious-driven business, consumer safety, dioxin, environmental effects, landfill, plastics, recovery, recycling, trash and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

27 Responses to Kill the K-cup

  1. Am I just the lone weirdo who downs a pot of coffee a day, and therefore finds the idea of keurig just plain silly? I mean, not silly as far as the environment, but I just don’t see why I should use pod after pod after pod instead of POOOOOT. Laziness indeed…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ronel Janse van Vuuren says:

    Love the video! I had no idea what a K-cup was before it…
    Yeah, a perfect cup of coffee can be made with the right instant coffee (I like Kronung’s and a very expensive Fair Trade one that I sometimes buy) and water boiled to the perfect temperature. Nothing else is needed. (I like my coffee dark and bitter… though I’ll sometimes add a natural sweetener if I feel for something sweet.) Or a French Press or an electric coffee maker where the coffee grounds can go to the compost heap… Making a great cup of coffee comes from practice: just like other good things in life.

    Ronel visiting from the A-Z Challenge with Music and Writing: Powerful K’s

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ken Dowell says:

    It surely must be possible to make a paper K-cup.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. lindasschaub says:

    The video was funny – apparently the K-cups are not. I’ve never had a Keurig machine nor ever handled a K-cup. I, “Ms. Exciting”, use Nescafe dark roast instant coffee and powdered creamer, though I do indulge in the instant cappaccino mixes made by Hills Brothers for a treat.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Pam Lazos says:

      Linda, I love Nescafe instant! I drank it every day when I lived in Athens for a summer since that’s what they served at the law school. They would shake it up and I think, although I may be misremembering and it’s just wishful thinking, that they put it over ice because it was so stinking hot and there was no air conditioning.

      Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        The Classico is great Pam – it is a dark roast that I love and I only have two cups a day so it would be wasteful for me to brew a pot of coffee. It also used to come in packets that look like tea bags – you steeped it and I’d drink thos black. In the Summer I make two cups of coffee in the morning – I’ll drink one and the other one I put a flavored creamer in it – I let it cool and when I return from walking, I have a cold coffee drink. I used to have chocolate milk as a reward for walking, but went back to coffee. When I was at Wayne State University (’76 to ’78), most of my classes were at Old Main – very old building and classrooms and I had to take one class in Summer as it conflicted with other “core classes” during the regular school year. It was ancient history and I went after I worked at the diner all day (7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.). Class started at 5:00 p.m. and it was so warm, ten minutes into class, the teacher droned, and I started to doze.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Pam Lazos says:

        That’s when you needed the Nescafé, Linda.😂

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        This is true Pam – that or “No-Doz” … I swear it felt like 100 degrees in the classroom, and no fan.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Pam Lazos says:

        Ah, I remember it well, but we had a fan!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        No amenities like that for us Pam – it was tough to stay awake in that class. The only interesting thing in that course was our professor had a friend who was a dentist that taught at the dental school at University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. That dentist and my professor were interested in mummies and had collaborated on a paper about early dentistry. They were using one mummy named “Poom II” (phonetic spelling here) and had made a slideshow on their dental discoveries. He treated us to viewing his slideshow. This professor was also interested in creating “Renaissance Festivals” that are now popular across the countries. We have one annually around Labor Day where the Festival employees get dressed up in period costumes, watch knights jousting and eat food from that era.
        He was one of the early proponents of the Renaissance Festival. He lived in Ann Arbor, always the home for creativity, even back in ’78.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Gayle Materna says:

    Love this’ll!!

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Liked by 1 person

  6. We don’t have a Keurig coffee maker, so I had no idea of the K-cup problem.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. dnbartlett says:

    Why kant i komment?I used to love the espresso maker that you gave me, the one that you and Chris got as a wedding present. When that finally died, my old boyfriend Joel bought me a Kuerig .Because I had always told him that I hated the Disposable pod issue, he bought me a reusable K-Cup. So, I don’t feel so horrible about using it ……Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

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    Liked by 1 person

  8. Susan Scott says:

    I’ve seen huge pieces of art made from them. But ditch them firstly. Use fair trade coffee and then it’s a win win 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Ally Bean says:

    I agree with you about the unnecessary amount of waste that K-cups create. I’ve never had a cup of coffee made in one of those machines that I thought tasted very good. We still brew our coffee with a good old electric coffee maker, measuring the coffee grounds, adding the water. Waiting. But it’s old school, I realize.

    Liked by 2 people

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